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Chesil beach

Chesil beach The shingle ramparts of Chesil Beach stretch for approximately 17 miles. It extends from Chesil Cove in the east to Bridport Harbour. The beach slopes very steeply especially at the eastern end so even a short cast will put your bait into deep water. Please note that the tides can be very dangerous along the beach with strong undercurrents. This is particularly true in a strong south westerly.

Chesil Cove
Chesil Cove lies at the easternmost extremity of Chesil Beach where it curves round to join the Isle of Portland. The cove is accessed via the village of Chiswell. Short casting puts you in fairly deep water so there's no need to belt a lead to the horizon. The bottom is increasingly snaggy as you move around to the left. Expect to catch bass, conger, pollack, dogfish, triggerfish and wrasse along with mackerel and garfish in the summer. Best bait, ragworm, squid, mackerel or frozen herring. Access to the beach is easy but the beach is made up of potato sized pebbles which makes walking knackering. The village is equipped with shops, a cafe and toilets.

Ferrybridge
As you leave Wyke Regis towards Portland, there is a pub on the right called the Ferrybridge Inn. You can get access behind the pub to fish The Fleet which is the area of water between Chesil Beach and the mainland. There are both bass and flounder here.
Underneath the bridge carrying the road over the inlet to The Fleet from Portland Harbour are several places that you can try with either a spinning rod or float set up for garfish, mackerel, bass or pollack according to season. Fish it a couple of hours each side of high water to give yourself the best chance of success. You can bottom fish for the same species although small wrasse will feature most in your catch if you use ragworm.

Just beyond the pub is the Chesil Beach Information Centre, a cafe and toilets. The car park here is pricey and the charges apply 24 hours a day. From the car park it's a short walk over the top of the shingle bank to the best fishing spots - said to be the wrecks of the 'Landing Craft' and the 'Adelaide' which are about 150 yards offshore. The Landing Craft is a noted Black Bream mark and the Adelaide is home to large number of Triggerfish during the summer months. This is a steep-to beach and even the feeblest of casts will put the bait in deep water. In truth this stretch of beach holds just about anything that swims in inshore waters. Top baits are ragworm, mackerel, squid and sandeels.

Chesil is very popular with tourists feathering for mackerel during the summer and by cod fisherman in winter. In the summer months you can guarantee there will always be one idiot pendulum casting dangerously close to fellow anglers. You can't miss him, he's Scottish and he's got a dog with him.

Abbotsbury
A road leads down to the sea from Abbotsbury village. From the coastal road between Weymouth and Bridport (B3157) turn off on a dangerous bend at the bottom of a steep hill that is signposted to the Subtropical Gardens. Go past the gardens and car parks to the end of the lane, there is a car park and toilet block on your left. An attendant will take money from you in the tourist season but not in winter. Although the steeply shelving beach is of shingle, just a little way offshore are patches of clean sand and shell. Bass, dogfish and mackerel are the main targets with codling and whiting in winter.

Cogden
Cogden beach is fine shingle giving way to sand at low tide. A snag free venue where you can catch most of the species that turn up along Chesil, long casting is not essential to fish here. There is a car park by the B3157. There are no facilities but what Cogden has is a pleasant and fairly short walk (10 minutes maximum) down to the beach across "access land" owned by National Trust. The surrounding countryside is rugged and good for spotting wildlife. Once on the beach you'll find yourself on one of the most easily accessible yet seemingly remote stretches of Chesil.

Burton Bradstock
Hive Beach is signposted from the B3157 as you leave Burton Bradstock going east. Look for the cafe sign. There is a car park next to the beach, charges apply in summer and a cafe which is open all year round and a toilet block. The car park is run by the National Trust, members can park for free. The beach is fine shingle giving way to sand at low tide. To the right of the car park, the sea bed is strewn with rocks, weed and numerous snags - perfect terrain for bass and big wrasse. In front of the car park and to left is fairly clean ground. The beach is not as steep as it is further east  and there is not the same depth of water.

West Bay
The shingle shoreline of West Bay is at the western extremity of Chesil Beach.The surrounding coastal scenery is pretty good with cliffs stretching away in either direction. The harbour is connected to the open sea by a long narrow channel between two piers. East Pier is the shorter of the two harbour arms and forms a stop to Chesil Beach. The West Pier has been renamed the Jurassic Pier. There are signs up on both piers banning all fishing methods other than float fishing or handlining. Fish can be caught close to the wall and long casting into the main channel is not necessary. Species you can expect are dabs, flounder, pout, whiting, plaice, dogfish and wrasse near the rocks. During the summer months expect bass, pollack,mullet, silver eel, mackerel and garfish. Best baits are ragworm or fish strips. Park in the long term car park that adjoins East Beach.

Tackle Shops:

Denning Tackle
114 Portland Road
Wyke Regis, Weymouth,
Dorset. DT4 9AD
Tel: 01305 783145

Weymouth Angling Centre
The Old Harbour House
24 Trinity Road, Weymouth
Dorset DT4 8TJ  
Tel: 01305 777771

Potters Tackle Shop
32 South Street
Bridport DT6 4EN
Tel: 01308 428226

West Bay Water Sports
10a West Bay
Bridport
Dorset
DT6 4EL
Tel: 01308 421800

Chesil is very popular with tourists feathering for mackerel during the summer and by cod fisherman in winter. In the summer months
you can guarantee there will always be one idiot pendulum casting dangerously close to fellow anglers. You can't miss him, he's

Scottish and he's got a dog with him.

Just beyond the pub is the Chesil Beach Information Centre, a snack bar and toilets. The car park here is pricey and the charges apply

24 hours a day. From the car park it's a short walk over the top of the shingle bank to the best fishing spots - said to be the wrecks of

the 'Landing Craft' and the 'Royal Adelaide' which are about 150 yards offshore. The Landing Craft is a noted Black Bream mark and

the Adelaide is home to a large number of Triggerfish during the summer months.  This is a steep-to beach and even the feeblest of

casts will put the bait in deep water. In truth this stretch of beach holds just about anything that swims in UK inshore waters. Top baits

are ragworm, mackerel, squid and sandeels.

Abbotsbury
A road leads down to the sea from Abbotsbury village. From the coastal road between Weymouth and Bridport (B3157) turn off on a

dangerous bend at the bottom of a steep hill that is signposted to the Subtropical Gardens. Go past the gardens and car parks to the

end of the lane, there is a car park and toilet block on your left. An attendant will take money from you in the tourist season but not in

winter. Although the steeply shelving beach is of shingle, just a little way offshore are patches of clean sand and shell. Bass, dogfish

and mackerel are the main targets with codling and whiting in winter.

Cogden
Cogden beach is fine shingle giving way to sand at low tide. A snag free venue where you can catch most of the species that turn up

along Chesil, long casting is not essential to fish here. There is a car park by the B3157. There are no facilities but what Cogden has is

a pleasant and fairly short walk (10 minutes maximum) down to the beach across "access land" owned by National Trust. The

surrounding countryside is rugged and good for spotting wildlife. Once on the beach you'll find yourself on one of the most easily

accessible yet seemingly remote stretches of Chesil.

Burton Bradstock
Hive Beach is signposted from the B3157 as you leave Burton Bradstock going east. Look for the cafe sign. There is a car park next to

the beach, charges apply in summer and a cafe which is open all year round and a toilet block. The car park is run by the National

Trust, members can park for free. The beach is fine shingle giving way to sand at low tide. To the right of the car park, the sea bed is

strewn with rocks, weed and numerous snags - perfect terrain for bass and big wrasse. In front of the car park and to left is fairly clean

ground. The beach is not as steep as it is further east  and there is not the same depth of water.


West Bay
The shingle shoreline of West Bay is at the western extremity of Chesil Beach.The surrounding coastal scenery is pretty good with

cliffs stretching away in either direction. The harbour is connected to the open sea by a long narrow channel between two piers. East

Pier is the shorter of the two harbour arms and forms a stop to Chesil Beach. The West Pier has been renamed the Jurassic Pier. There

are signs up on both piers banning all fishing methods other than float fishing or handlining. Fish can be caught close to the wall and

long casting into the main channel is not necessary. Species you can expect are dabs, flounder, pout, whiting, plaice, dogfish and

wrasse near the rocks. During the summer months expect bass, pollack,mullet, silver eel, mackerel and garfish. Best baits are ragworm

or fish strips. Park in the long term car park that adjoins East Beach.


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